Wednesday, September 4, 2013

futurejournalismproject:

MegaNews: A Modern-day Newsstand

via bigthink:

MegaNews Magazines is up and running in Stockholm, hoping to change the modern media landscape. The newsstand kiosk allows for on the spot, high quality, color prints of a wide range of magazines and periodicals (200 at present). 

[…] The machine (which takes up space of less than 4 square meters) allows customers to choose the publication they want to buy via a touchscreen, pay with a credit card, and get a copy, printed on the spot, in two minutes. The newsstand is connected to the internet and can download upon request the latest pdf files from any partner publisher’s server.

According to Stefan Melesko, a lecturer in Media Economics, 10% of the entire cost structure for most publications consists of distribution costs. In addition, publishers produce a surplus of copies, at times being unable to sell up to 30-40% of them and accruing additional expenses for handling the returns. On-demand printing newsstands like Meganews Magazines can save publishers money on printing and distribution. They can also help them reach customers whenever and wherever, while giving them real time feedback on sales.

Images: YouTube, Stills of MegaNews Magazines video

Tuesday, August 6, 2013
Readers below about age 40, who have known the Post only during its beleaguered, downsizing-its-way-out-of-trouble era, may find it hard to imagine the role it once played. Over the past decade-plus, the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal have been the national newspaper organizations. It already seems antique even to use the word “newspaper” in such a construction, for reasons I don’t need to belabor now. But their flagship daily print publications make the NYT and the WSJ similar to the Financial Times and different from the other remaining ambitious news organizations — Bloomberg and Thomson Reuters, the broadcast and cable networks, NPR, etc.

There was a time when you would automatically have included the Post in that first-tier national grouping.
James Fallows, on why the sale of the Washington Post is significant. (via theatlantic)
Saturday, May 25, 2013
Just as we teach our children how to ride a bike, we need to teach them how to navigate social media and make the right moves that will help them. The physical world is similar to the virtual world in many cases. It’s about being aware. We can prevent many debacles if we’re educated. The Truth About Kids And Social Media (via fastcompany)
Tuesday, April 23, 2013

What you read is important, but not all important. How you read is the main consideration. For if you know how to read, there’s a world of education even in the newspapers, the magazines, on a single billboard or a stray advertising dodger.

Th secret of good reading is this: read critically!

Timeless wisdom from 75+ years ago: How to acquire knowledge. (via explore-blog)
Friday, March 15, 2013
via Washington Post: 

A composite image has been making its way around the Internet that appears to juxtapose images of the throng in St. Peter’s Square in 2005 during the announcement of Pope Benedict’s election with the audience present during that of Pope Francis.
But here’s thing, the photos weren’t taken at those times.
The lower photo (shown below this paragraph), which features a sea of smartphones and tablets, was, indeed, taken during the announcement of Pope Francis’s election. But the top photo (shown above), which shows an audience with far fewer gadgets was taken during the funeral procession of Pope John Paul II — a very different mood and event type. 

You can blame Reddit, where this likely originated, but a better target is yourself/me/us/the lack of news literacy training. It took the Internet about 24 hours to suss out the false premise here, which is decently fast, but by then the image had already spread far and wide (and studies show that mistakes travel further, and remain in people’s memories longer, than any sort of corrections.) Again, a mirror unto ourselves, the abyss gazes back into you, etc. 

via Washington Post

A composite image has been making its way around the Internet that appears to juxtapose images of the throng in St. Peter’s Square in 2005 during the announcement of Pope Benedict’s election with the audience present during that of Pope Francis.

But here’s thing, the photos weren’t taken at those times.

The lower photo (shown below this paragraph), which features a sea of smartphones and tablets, was, indeed, taken during the announcement of Pope Francis’s election. But the top photo (shown above), which shows an audience with far fewer gadgets was taken during the funeral procession of Pope John Paul II — a very different mood and event type. 

You can blame Reddit, where this likely originated, but a better target is yourself/me/us/the lack of news literacy training. It took the Internet about 24 hours to suss out the false premise here, which is decently fast, but by then the image had already spread far and wide (and studies show that mistakes travel further, and remain in people’s memories longer, than any sort of corrections.) Again, a mirror unto ourselves, the abyss gazes back into you, etc. 

Wednesday, March 13, 2013
futurejournalismproject:

Using the Newspaper as a Textbook
Newspaper in Education Week is an annual celebration of the newspaper as a classroom resource. This year, the American Press Institute has partnered with the Newseum to create a free downloadable curriculum for middle school and high school students (there are extension activities for elementary school students) featuring six lessons aligned with Common Core State Standards. 
Lessons are as follows:

Newspapers in Your Life
What’s News Where?
The First Rough Draft of History
In the Newsroom
The Fairness Formula
Planning for the Unpredictable
Media Literacy
Where News Comes From
Evaluating the News

Somewhat Related: I recently encountered TuvaLabs, a startup that creates math classroom content using news and current events. A fantastic concept.—Jihii
Image: via emissourian.

This is a huge, valuable resource. News literacy has been blowing up on the media radar lately, not least due to a new report by Pew Research on technology in the classroom.

futurejournalismproject:

Using the Newspaper as a Textbook

Newspaper in Education Week is an annual celebration of the newspaper as a classroom resource. This year, the American Press Institute has partnered with the Newseum to create a free downloadable curriculum for middle school and high school students (there are extension activities for elementary school students) featuring six lessons aligned with Common Core State Standards

Lessons are as follows:

Newspapers in Your Life

  • What’s News Where?
  • The First Rough Draft of History

In the Newsroom

  • The Fairness Formula
  • Planning for the Unpredictable

Media Literacy

  • Where News Comes From
  • Evaluating the News

Somewhat Related: I recently encountered TuvaLabs, a startup that creates math classroom content using news and current events. A fantastic concept.—Jihii

Image: via emissourian.

This is a huge, valuable resource. News literacy has been blowing up on the media radar lately, not least due to a new report by Pew Research on technology in the classroom.

Monday, February 11, 2013
thursdayfiledigest:

Child-friendly newspapers “An augmented-reality app that ‘translates’ grown-up newspapers for children has been developed in Japan,” reports BBC News. The Tokyo Shimbun, one of the country’s biggest dailies, has worked with advertising firm Dentsu to create the software. “It allows children to hold a smartphone over the newspaper to see a child-friendly version of the text. In a promotional video, Dentsu said the app could ‘create a future for the old media newspaper.’… The demo video shows a father laying a newspaper out on a table as the child holds his smartphone over the page. Cartoon characters appear on the screen, explaining stories and drawing attention to important words.”

Could be huge for #digitalliteracy #newsliteracy

thursdayfiledigest:

Child-friendly newspapers “An augmented-reality app that ‘translates’ grown-up newspapers for children has been developed in Japan,” reports BBC News. The Tokyo Shimbun, one of the country’s biggest dailies, has worked with advertising firm Dentsu to create the software. “It allows children to hold a smartphone over the newspaper to see a child-friendly version of the text. In a promotional video, Dentsu said the app could ‘create a future for the old media newspaper.’… The demo video shows a father laying a newspaper out on a table as the child holds his smartphone over the page. Cartoon characters appear on the screen, explaining stories and drawing attention to important words.”

Could be huge for #digitalliteracy #newsliteracy

Monday, December 17, 2012
Wednesday, November 28, 2012

futurejournalismproject:

Anthony De Rosa: Why Newsrooms Should Poach Tech and Startup Talent

Anthony De Rosa is Reuters’ Social Media Editor, where he’s also a columnist and host at ReutersTV. We sat down with him to discuss where the tech and news communities meet and, increasingly, overlap.

Being that the news industry has more than a few business problems these days, Anthony suggests hiring outside help. By choosing Craigslist, Groupon and Facebook as examples of places from which to steal employees, De Rosa makes a solid point: go where the success is, and learn from the people that have done smart things in the more turbulent and burgeoning media landscapes.

Anthony also discusses what news life is like at Reuters, which we’ll dive into in more detail over the coming weeks. Stay tuned!

And for more FJP videos, see our new site, theFJP.org.

Monday, November 12, 2012

Why “Googling It” Isn’t Enough

via PBS Media/Shift:

According to a survey of more than 2,000 middle and high school teachers, “research” for today’s students means “Googling,” and as a result, doing research “has shifted from a relatively slow process of intellectual curiosity and discovery to a fast-paced, short-term exercise aimed at locating just enough information to complete an assignment.”

PBS’s advice, which I agree with in theory but not in practice:

1. PROMOTE DIGITAL LITERACY — AND TRADITIONAL LITERACY, TOO

2. ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO FACT-FIND FACE-TO-FACE

3. GUIDE THEM TO SEARCH DEEPER.

Face-to-face is overrated and really not contributing to the literacy skill set needed to navigate the web. I believe it comes down to building minds and a culture that INSISTS on fact-checking, that doesn’t believe everything it hears but does take credibility seriously and does not hold an innate distrust of “the media.” Not an easy balance to strike, of course. 

PS - this study is the Pew Internet & American Life Project’s recent report, "How Teens do Research in the Digital World.

Friday, November 9, 2012
A Politico headline: “GOP soul-searching: ‘Too old, too white, too male?’”

Around noon Wednesday, I started hearing a voice inside my election-addled head: Where else had I seen numbers like these? Where had I heard that Politico description? Who else was getting a really good market share of a smaller and smaller slice of the population?

Ah, yes: the newspaper industry.
Ken Doctor, Nieman Lab. The newsonomics of the newspaper industry as the Republican Party. (via futurejournalismproject)
Monday, November 5, 2012
In the end, 47% of these teachers strongly agree that the literacy of these students has yet to catch up with the Internet. 44% of the same teachers say that schools should be focusing on digital literacy in their core curriculums. Red Orbit reports  on a new survey on youth, academics and digital technology from the Pew Internet and American Life Project
Thursday, October 11, 2012
The amount of meaningful information relative to the overall amount information is declining. We’re not that much smarter than we used to be, even though we have much more information — and that means the real skill now is learning how to pick out the useful information from all this noise. Nate Silver (via sometimesagreatnotion)
Friday, September 21, 2012
But editors and professors recognize that the best way to understand the future of journalism lies in learning from and working with students.

And so, Mercer University is starting a $5.6 million project to collaborate with the Macon Newspaper and Georgia Public Radio.

via The New York Times:

Reporters and editors for the 186-year-old paper The Telegraph and the radio station will work out of the campus’s new journalism center, alongside students whom the university expects will do legwork for newspaper and public radio reports, with guidance from their professors and working journalists. 

It’s a plan born in part of desperation. Like many newspapers, The Telegraph has lost circulation and advertising revenue in the last decade, and the public radio station was forced to trim down to one staff member during the recession. 

William D. Underwood, Mercer’s president, expects that by applying what he calls a medical residency model to journalism, all of these players may give the struggling industry a chance to stay alive.

Bonus: This report [PDF] from the New America Foundation entitled “Shaping 21st Century Journalism: Leveraging a ‘Teaching Hospital Model’ in Journalism Education”

(via futurejournalismproject)